spice


Local produce have played an important part in forming their own culinary styles. Some religious groups have modified these regional cuisines to suit their own requirements. famous of all diamonds and a veritable household name in many parts of the world. Legend has suggested that stone may date from before the time of Christ; theory indicates the possibility of its appearance in the early years of the 1300s; history provides its existence for the past two and a half centuries.

Famous of all diamonds and a veritable household name in many parts of the world. Legend has suggested that stone may date from before the time of Christ; theory indicates the possibility of its appearance in the early years of the 1300s; history provides its existence for the past two and a half centuries. In 1992 a new HM Stationary Office publication on the British Crown Jewels and regalia gave the revised weight of 105.602 metric carats for the Koh-I-Noor and not the 108.93 metric carat conversion figure previously published. The stone was found to measure 36.00 * 31.90 * 13.04 mm. The stone is set in the Maltese Cross at the front of the crown made for Queen Elizabeth the Queen Mother and because of uncertainty as to the precise weight in the HMSO Publication, the opportunity was taken in 1988 to have the stone removed during the maintenance and cleaning of the crown by the Crown Jeweller, Mr.Bill Summers, at Garrard & Co. It was weighed in the presences of witnesses on a modern certified electronic balance.

We are delighted to welcome you to the Koh-I-Noor Restaurant and to our extensive range of wonderful dishes. We have, of course, included many of your established favourites alongside a careful selection of Chef’s Specialities, all beautifully prepared and remaining true to the regional cuisines of Bangladesh, India and other parts of the sub-continent. We have taken great care to bring you a variety of flavours from the different regions, showing of the wonderful cooking of the sub-continent. And we have also included a few items from European cusine.

Before you savour our culinary delights, you may wish to discover and appreciate the origins of this style of cuisine. Bangladesh, India and other areas of the subcontinent together covers more than 1.5 M square miles of varied landscapes, divided into many territories in which geography and Local produce have played an important part in forming their own culinary styles. Some religious groups have modified these regional cuisines to suit their own requirements.

History has also had its influence on the sub-continent’s cuisine. British colonialists introduced cutlets, which Indian cooks adapted by marinating them in garlic and ginger. The Moghuls, who came to India via Persia in the mid 15th century, introduced the milder pilaus, and meat or poultry cooked in yoghurt, cream, and other dairy products.

The common denominator in Indian cooking is the use of spices. These primarily consist of cinnamon, cardamom, cloves, bayleaf, mint, methi leaves, curry leaves, black pepper, cumin, fennel seeds, mustard seeds, coriander, ginger, garlic and turmeric, to name but a few. These spices can be left whole and fried or roasted, crushed or ground with water and vinegar to form a paste. The combinations are endless, as are the variety of tastes. Each method draws out a completely different flavour from the spice. It is this carefully orchestrated use of spices and seasonings that gives our food its unique character.

The use of spices does not make the dish hot. The heat, termed ‘Jal’ in Indian cuisine, comes from chilies, which were introduced to the Indian sub-continent in the century by the Portuguese. The majority of dishes on our menu are mild to medium in strength. However, there are a handful of ‘Jal’ dishes where chilies have been used sparingly. These are clearly indicated for ease of selection.

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Nasar Choudhury
(Dynamic Concepts & Futuristic Cuisine)